India potent enough to remain No. 1: Dennis Lillee

Australian pace bowling great Dennis Lille said there was no reason why India cannot sustain their numero uno Test status.

updated: January 30, 2010 12:29 IST
  • Total Shares


Contradicting his former captain Ian Chappell's statement, Australian pace bowling great Dennis Lille on Friday said there was no reason why India cannot sustain their numero uno Test status.

"I don't agree with Ian Chappel's that India cannot sustain their number one status in Test cricket," Lillee told reporters at the MRF Pace Foundation here.

"I don't see a reason why India can't sustain their position. At the moment India has a balanced attack. Sometimes it is not all about out and out fast bowling. Australia also lacks a genuine tearaway pacers. Except Dale Steyn there are not many bowlers who can be express and also deal with swing and seam," he said.

Chappell had said recently said that it is unlikely that India will sustain their number one Test status as they quality bowling attack and batting alone cannot deliver the goods for them for a longer period.

But Lillee begs to differ with Chappell and said former India captain Kapil Dev is a classic example of what a fast bowler can do if he can exploit the conditions well enough.

"As long as the bowlers know what to do with the conditions, it should be fine. There is no greater example than Kapil Dev who got the job done irrespective of where he was operating (at home or overseas). I don't agree with Ian's (Chappell) take on India," he said.

Lillee feels bowlers will always be under batsman's mercy in Twenty20 cricket but those who have quality will denitely come good.

"When the format is truncated, the bowlers will obviously targeted more. It is not only with the fast bowlers, it applies to all types of bowlers.

"But Glen McGrath bowled brilliantly in the first edition of the IPL and Daniel Vettori has been good too. So it all boils downs to the quality," he said.

He also said that he was not surprised at all by the growing popularity of Twenty20 cricket.

"People come in to see fast paced action. All they want is live entertainment of three hours like most other sports. T20 is turning out to be a good family outing. When WACA and Victoria had arranged a private game a few seasons back, it drew in a decent crowd. I was convinced on the format then," Lillee said.

The Australian also said he was overwhelmed to see his name bestowed in the ICC Hall of Fame.

"On being inducted into the ICC Hall of Fame is a huge honour. It was an humbling experience as my name is alongside some of the players I grew up idolising. You never dream of these things when you grow up. I did not believe I would be seen in the same league as some of the names there," Lillee said.