BMW Williams unveils new F1 car

<img border='0' align='left' title=' ' src=' ' class='caption'> The BMW Williams F1 Team is ready to put its radical new look car, the FW 26 in the countdown to the 2004 F1 season opener in Melbourne on March 7.

updated: February 25, 2007 10:05 IST
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As final preparations are made for the 2004 Formula One season opener in Melbourne on Sunday March 7, the BMW Williams F1 Team is ready to put its radical new look car, the FW 26 and the world leading design technology behind it to the test in the world's most technically advanced sporting arena. As Principal Sponsor of the BMW Williams F1 Team since 2000, Hewlett Packard (HP) technology has played a key role in the development of the strikingly different aerodynamic shape of the new WilliamsF1 BMW FW26. BMW Williams FW26 overview The most notable difference to last year's BMW WilliamsF1 Team's challenger (the FW25) is the switch from a 'single keel' to a 'twin keel' chassis design with a shorter nose cone and protruding front pillars. These have already been likened to elephant or walrus tusks, but perhaps more closely resemble a manta ray's front fins. The radical design of the shorter, wider and higher nose cone and the resulting increase in the size of the aperture beneath it, allows more air to pass under the car, while the removal of the single keel hump underneath the monocoque simultaneously reduces interference to the airflow, with the ultimate aim of increasing downforce. Aerodynamics & design overview As well as the new front configuration, the FW26 incorporates changes to the F1 technical regulations, which demand a bigger rear wing with a reduced number of planes and a larger engine cover. This is intended to accommodate the new rule for 2004 that only one engine will be allowed per car per race weekend. The BMW WiliamsF1 Team will use a new engine for the 2004 season - the BMW P84. In addition to all the key members of the design team, Antonia Terzi, WilliamsF1's Italian born and trained Chief Aerodynamicist, speaks for the first time on her role within the process and explains how she used HP technology to analyse the vital aerodynamic data that led in part to the design of the new car. (AP)